Grammar questions.

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Dreamweaver
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Grammar questions.

Post by Dreamweaver » 01 Nov 2017, 18:59

I just failed 2 questions in a grammar quiz.
A. She snuck out or she sneaked out?
B. The staff is in agreement or are in agreement?

For A you will probably need to be American to get it right.
For B, consider
If the collective noun (staff) is acting as a single unit, use the singular verb: “The staff is very efficient.” If the collective noun is meant to highlight the actions of discrete individuals who are all doing different things, use the plural verb: “The staff are working on many projects for the holiday party.”
I admit I was wrong. By replacing 'staff' with 'majority' I could still be wrong in the opposite direction! :hitting_wall

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Perrorist
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Re: Grammar questions.

Post by Perrorist » 01 Nov 2017, 20:58

"Snuck" is American; "sneaked" in the UK and most English-speaking countries.

"Staff" is like "media" and "data", i.e. can be singular or plural. Switching from "is" to "are" and vice versa is confusing. In the question shown, "are" is the obvious selection.

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Mahalia
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Re: Grammar questions.

Post by Mahalia » 01 Nov 2017, 21:01

I would probably use 'snuck out' today, although 'sneaked out' would be the correct English version I suspect. The English language and its usage is constantly changing :heeheehee

Since staff is a collective term I would use are in agreement as relating to the plural rather than the singular is in agreement.
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Re: Grammar questions.

Post by Dreamweaver » 01 Nov 2017, 22:21

Another, dived/dove, where America follows the example of drived/drove, is quite logical, but I'll stick with dived! :lol: I also like their use of the old English Fall instead of Autumn, which I imagine was once rather pretentious. Truly, the language is constantly evolving.

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Re: Grammar questions.

Post by Warrigal » 02 Nov 2017, 02:50

My rule of thumb is that if the audience you are talking to understands your drift and doesn't get confused by some unusual grammatical variation, then you are using the English language effectively.
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Re: Grammar questions.

Post by Dreamweaver » 02 Nov 2017, 16:35

=D=

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godfather
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Re: Grammar questions.

Post by godfather » 02 Nov 2017, 21:48

The opinion of an English newbies would be this:

A) "sneaked out". When you conjugate 'sneak' where does it show "snuck" in the past presence?

B) "is" would suggest it is appropriate for one or more staff, it is a dependable explanation not relying on mumbers alone!

:icon_biggrin: :icon_biggrin: :icon_biggrin:

Of course I'll stand corrected! :high_fives: :high_fives: :high_fives:
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Re: Grammar questions.

Post by Dreamweaver » 03 Nov 2017, 08:23

One thing for sure, English isn't logical!
:lol:

English is the Queerest Language
By Anonymous

We’ll begin with a box, and the plural is boxes,
But the plural of ox should be oxen, not oxes.
Then one fowl is a goose, but two are called geese,
Yet the plural of mouse should never be meese,
You may find a lone mouse or a whole nest of mice,
But the plural of house is houses, not hice.

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Re: Grammar questions.

Post by lynny » 03 Nov 2017, 08:59

I like that DW ! =D=

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