Bangkok

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mavisbramston
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Posts: 1641
Joined: 26 Feb 2016, 20:32

Bangkok

Post by mavisbramston » 12 Jan 2018, 23:25

Why do I love Bangkok? Its disgustingly hot even humid. Its chaoticly over crowded. You cant help feeling squashed every where. It stinks. Yet the minute a Thai smiles at you all is forgiven.
I constantly return. There have been a few changes I dont like but it still remains inspiring.
I love the street food and the enterprising nature of the Thai.
The street stalls are incredible and without that the whole Thai economy.
I have learned a few tricks. You can get food poisoning anywhere, . Years ago I got it in a Four or five star restaurant.
Dont reject the street food. Just be cautious.
The water is fine providing you boil it. I use bottled water.

mavisbramston
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Re: Bangkok

Post by mavisbramston » 12 Jan 2018, 23:43

Do go to Bangkok. Theres much that is awful such as pollution and often animals are badly treated. The fruit is brilliant. Pommelo is gorgeous. Trouble is in Melbourne its awful dry tasteless and over priced. Here its juicy and cheap.

mavisbramston
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Re: Bangkok

Post by mavisbramston » 13 Jan 2018, 21:33

The food is generally amazing. I did find grasshoppers rathe r challenging. I tried them but to be frank just very crunchy and only tasted of the oil they were cooked in. Not revolting just pointless.
I gave cock roaches a miss.
Congee for breakfast is delightful. Its a rice porridge. Savoury eaten with fish sauce etc. savoury rather than sweet.

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kfchugo
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Location: Lake Macquarie NSW

Re: Bangkok

Post by kfchugo » 14 Jan 2018, 05:25

Try a fruit called chompoo.....shaped like a pear but texture of an apple.....very refreshing.

mavisbramston
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Re: Bangkok

Post by mavisbramston » 17 Jan 2018, 23:40

I will look for it kfhugo. I love the fruit here mangostein is yummy

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Dreamweaver
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Location: Victoria

Re: Bangkok

Post by Dreamweaver » 18 Jan 2018, 09:11

Is that the same as the Nashi Pear? I have one growing. Here in Victoria they do quite well, if you like them (and I do) do yourself a favour and plant a tree! :icon_biggrin:
Grown for the crisp juicy fruit, Nashi Pears are an Asian pear and and differ greatly from the familiar European types. All Nashis are cultivars of P. pyrifolia, P. ussuriensis or P x bretscheneideri. These are a low chill fruit tree, so it can be grown right through from Melbourne to Sydney and Brisbane. They are also self pollinating so you only need one tree to produce lots of fruit.

These are a medium sized fruit tree, most varieties reaching around 3 metres in height. .Nashi pear season is in autumn, this is when they are freshly picked, although they are available in shops through to spring. Fruiting time does vary from the early types such as Choju and Shinsui, which will be ready to pick in January.
Late maturing varieties include Tsu Li, Shen Li and Okusankichi. Different varieties have different keeping qualities and ripening times so talk to the supplier before purchasing.

Nashi Pear Varieties
A number of varieties are grown both in the home garden and commercially, popular varieties include :

Nijisseiki – A chance seedling of P. pyrifolia. Rounded green skinned fruit, heavy cropping with fruit smallish in size. Excellent eating.
Kosui – A P. pyrifolia cultivator with golden yellow to brown fruit. Mis season harvest.
Ya Li – This is a P. bretschneideri cultivar. The fruit is more ‘pear shaped’ than many. And a late harvest variety
Hosui – A P.pyrifolia hybrid. Rounded golden brown skinned fruit. Harvest is mid season.
Okusankichi is one of the largest fruiting varieties, late to fruit, but long lasting, with a brown skin.
Other varieties include – Shinsui, Chojuro, Tsu Li, Dan Bae, Hakko, Hosui, Shinsetsu, Hwa Hong, Niitaka, Shinsei, Bong Ri, Choju, Haeng Soo, Shin Soo, Shin Go, Kikusui, Yakumo, Shinseiki, Shinko and Shen Li.

Care
This is versatile fruit tree, the Nashi can be grown in similar conditions to pears. Most require a pollinator.

Choose a sunny position with a humus rich well drained soil.

Weed and dig over the soil to an area about twice the size of the pot, or root ball.
Prepare the soil by digging in some well rotted compost, cow manure and some blood and bone.
Remove the tree from the container and carefully prune off any damaged roots.
Ensure that the graft is above the soil level.
Backfill and water in with a liquid seaweed fertiliser.
Water regularly though the first few summers.
Nashi pears, are suited to espalier growing
Pruning
Nashi Pears are best pruned in late winter. The idea is to keep the tree a reasonable size, improve fruiting and maintain a sound tree structure.

some summer pruning may be required. This involves the removal of any water shoots as well as thinning fruit if needed.

Pests include.
Codling Moth
Mites
Pear and cherry slug

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