Ned Kelly

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mavisbramston
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Ned Kelly

Post by mavisbramston » 27 Oct 2017, 09:36

Not sure where this should go.
Ok here goes.
How you answer this really depends on your back ground but its always interesting.
Do you think Ned Kelly was a hero?
Its become popular to label Ned as just a criminal and killer.
Well as an old leftie trade union sympathiser you can pretty much predict from me its a YES.
I believe he was a hero and go as far to suggest the Jerilderie letter remains a very important national icon.
He was a victim of squatter laws and his rebellion against the establishment was courageous. He killed in self defence.
The police of Neds day were hardly beacons of law, they were not to be admired.
You certainly dont have to agree.
Such is life.

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Mahalia
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Re: Ned Kelly

Post by Mahalia » 27 Oct 2017, 16:29

The issue of Ned Kelly is always cause for great discussion with the two public fields of opinion split between Ned as an Australian folk hero and the view of the establishment that he was a murderer who got his just rewards . The fact that the story has a resonance with the Australian psyche cannot be ignored. Kelly is still today a popular cultural icon perceived as Australia’s own version of Robin Hood.


SUCH IS LIFE ... Maureen Clifford © The #ScribblyBark Poet


‘Mind you die like a Kelly son – don’t hang your head in shame.’
Harsh words torn from a mothers lips – she’d never know his fame.
Both imprisoned in Melbourne Gaol, these words at him she flung,
eleventh day, eleventh month, just before her Ned hung.
Seven thousand gathered, thirty two thousand had signed
a petition for Ned’s release. Authorities were blind
and deaf to pleas. The execution set, they would not sway.
‘Mind you die like a Kelly son’ Ellen was heard to say.

Ellen lived to ninety two, out back on her selection,
outliving seven children – no doubt cause for reflection.
Her final years were spent in peace – her fighting days were done
but down the ages echoing – ‘die like a Kelly son.’
And through the long annals of time a legend has been born.
A man, a criminal no doubt, a child of devils spawn.
A bloke who stood against the odds – defied authority;
and died proud - like a Kelly – unbowed by society.

From Echuca on the Murray and many places in between
to her last days at Eleven Mile Creek, Ellen Kelly was seen.
The little town of Greta ‘neath Mount Molly Morgan’s slopes
was the place she died and found her rest – abandoning her hopes.
And written in the pages of Australian history
are the stories of the Kelly gang – and of their killing spree
but one can’t help but ponder over certain circumstances
that kicked in causing fate to dance with chance and tight finances.

For no doubt constraints of cash and little opportunity
had just a bit to do with how this story came to be.
Given a fair shake, half a chance, a bit of plain good luck,
would they have been respectable and not have run amuck?
But history is what it is – from such are legends born
In the annals of Australia these truths are solemnly sworn.
Those last words from Ned’s Mother – to a young man doomed but brave
‘mind you die like a Kelly son’. Words he took to his grave.


‘Such is life’ are reported to be the last words spoken by Ned Kelly
The Scribbly Bark Poet
see some scribbles here - http://scribblybarkpoetry.blogspot.com.au/

mavisbramston
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Re: Ned Kelly

Post by mavisbramston » 27 Oct 2017, 20:45

Loved it. Thank you. Trying to recall where I have heard that poem or one like it. Ithink the notion he was a criminal has gained popular momentum in recent years. Its a kind of iconaclastic attitude. I think mostly due to the tendency of a kind of cultutal cringe. I dont think the people who see him as a criminal undestand Kelly. Its a very shallow surface understanding of the period. Kelly was a romantic hero.

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terra
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Re: Ned Kelly

Post by terra » 29 Oct 2017, 13:10

Nowadays, we treat Ned like a folk hero..... :thinking:

But, to me, the best criminal was Robin Hood. He robbed the rich to give to the poor.
I don't see any evidence that Ned Kelly did that !
"Life's too short to drink cheap wine".

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Perrorist
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Re: Ned Kelly

Post by Perrorist » 29 Oct 2017, 14:51

I was born in Nottingham and Robin Hood was our hero.

Robin Hood, Robin Hood, riding through the glen...

mavisbramston
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Re: Ned Kelly

Post by mavisbramston » 29 Oct 2017, 17:43

terra wrote:
29 Oct 2017, 13:10
Nowadays, we treat Ned like a folk hero..... :thinking:

But, to me, the best criminal was Robin Hood. He robbed the rich to give to the poor.
I don't see any evidence that Ned Kelly did that !
Terra these days its the other way around. Most people see Ned much as you do. Nearly every one i know sees him as a murderer. I think its swung the other way.
To me he was a hero.
But although we might see it differently I do appreciate your interest and contribution. Doing a bit of research.
Not sure if he gave to the poor but he did stand for social justice.
But giving to the poor like Robin Hood did is more than likely an exageration. Its true he gave people money and while it appears to have been generous its more likely to have had a motive behind it. I think many cleverer people than me think it was to buy protection from the cops.
It was to keep people quiet. Ned gave money for silence.

It is important to remember the police at the time were incredibly corrupt.

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Dreamweaver
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Re: Ned Kelly

Post by Dreamweaver » 29 Oct 2017, 18:58

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=69 ... ls&f=false
Look at pages 279-280

I would copy excerpts if I knew how!

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godfather
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Re: Ned Kelly

Post by godfather » 29 Oct 2017, 23:31

And here is me thinking that Ned Kelly was still alive and now works for the ATO in Canberra!

Oh, wrong again, such is Life.

:lol: :lol: :lol:
The devil whispered, “You cannot withstand the storm“ and I replied: “I am the storm!”.....Unknown.

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Warrigal
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Re: Ned Kelly

Post by Warrigal » 30 Oct 2017, 03:34

I'm a Kelly admirer. He was a man of spirit who refused to be crushed by a system that was stacked against the Irish and children of old lags, and he was both.

He was certainly a horse thief and in those days that was a serious offence. He did not become an notorious outlaw until the police harassed his mother and sister and one of them ended up taking a bullet to a finger.

The killing at Stringy Bark Creek was indeed self defence but this event seal the fate of very member of the gang.

Thereafter they would enter a town, round up the population into the hotel and then rob the bank. They never hurt any of them and some accounts indicate the captives had a pretty good time. The comparison with the legendary Robin Hood holds up because in spite of many people knowing his whereabouts he was never turned in for the hefty reward offered. He did indeed give some needy folk some of his ill gotten gains and he always treated women with respect. Ned Kelly was a gentleman, or would have lived as one but for an accident of birth. The Jerilderie letter is proof of his intellect and passion.

He was at war with the constabulary and came undone when he planned to blow up a train carrying police and black trackers who were coming after him. The siege in the hotel at Glenrowan and the iconic armour is well remembered but I wonder how many realise that Ned was not in the hotel where his brother and two friends were under heavy fire. He fought his way back to them and when captured had a couple of dozen bullet wounds to his arms and legs. This is very gutsy. In a war it would earn a medal for valour.

Think what a boy/man like Ned Kelly could have achieved if the odds were not so stacked against him.

PS Love the poem.
The difference between knowledge and faith is like the difference between knowing about friendship and having a friend.

mavisbramston
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Re: Ned Kelly

Post by mavisbramston » 30 Oct 2017, 08:15

Thanks folks.
That was superb Warrigal.
I wonder why it has become so popular to dismiss Ned as a criminal? I am not saying you guys are wrong, i guess its another perspective.. In my youth to say that was treason but maybe that was my working class back ground.
That must have been quite a party in the pub.

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Dreamweaver
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Re: Ned Kelly

Post by Dreamweaver » 30 Oct 2017, 09:11

While agreeing with all Warri has said, has there ever been a time when we could get away with killing police? Even now that the death penalty has gone , if a person knowingly murders a police officer the minimum sentence is 25 years in prison.

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