World going to the dogs?

Major issues which will affect Australia and the World

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Dreamweaver
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World going to the dogs?

Post by Dreamweaver » 18 Jan 2018, 21:38

A recent survey suggests that 71% of people think that the world is going to the dogs.
Are things actually that bad, or is it a psychological trick of the mind?

https://www.theguardian.com/science/hea ... MP=soc_567

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Warrigal
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Re: World going to the dogs?

Post by Warrigal » 20 Jan 2018, 09:55

Historically, we live in the best of times.
If you don't have an ASIO file by now then you should be ashamed of yourself.

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kfchugo
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Re: World going to the dogs?

Post by kfchugo » 20 Jan 2018, 19:13

The way the world is at the moment, I dont imagine the dogs would want it.

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Dreamweaver
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Re: World going to the dogs?

Post by Dreamweaver » 20 Jan 2018, 19:50

There was only one period when the world got worse instead of better - interestingly the age of enlightenment, the reformation, Martin Luther, etc. But the end result was a continued improvement.

The average person has never been better fed than today. Between 1961 and 2002, the world average daily food supply per person increased by 24% (38% in developing nations). Chronic undernourishment in developing nations declined from 37 to 17 percent of their population between 1969–71 and 2000-02.

Greater agricultural productivity and international trade has caused inflation-adjusted prices of food commodities to decline by 75 percent since 1950.

Access to safe water and sanitation has increased.

Before industrialization, at least one out of every five children died before reaching his or her first birthday, equivalent to more than 20%. In 2003 the worldwide rate was 5.7% which is approximately the same as the developed nations had in 1950. The progress is illustrated by that many developing nations, such as India, Peru, and Ghana, in 1998 had a lower infant mortality than the US had in 1913.

For much of human history, life expectancy used to be between 20–30 years. By 1900 it had increased to 31 years. By 2003 it was 66.8 years. Even in Africa, the poorest continent, it has increased to 45.6 years. Not only are people living longer, they are also healthier in old age. During the course of the 20th century, the average onsets of diseases such heart disease (9 years), respiratory disease (11 years), and cancer (8 years), have been delayed.

Between 1970 and the early 2000s, global illiteracy rates dropped from 36 to 18 percent. Globally, the percentage of relevant population enrolled in tertiary education increased from 6.8 to 25.6 percent between 1965 and 2001.

Worldwide child labor (age 10-14) has decreased from 24.9 percent in 1960 to 10.5 percent in 2003.

Total lifetime spent working for the average British worker declined from 50 to 20 percent of the total "disposable life hours" between 1856 and 1981.

Due mainly to improved and cheaper lighting, the increase in free time is arguable even greater, since darkness previously greatly restricted available activities, especially for the poor.

In 1900 no country had universal suffrage and only 12.4 percent of the world's population had even limited suffrage. Today 44.1 percent of the world's population live in nations deemed free by Freedom House and another 18.6 percent in nations deemed partly free.

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