Australian expressions

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Dreamweaver
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Australian expressions

Post by Dreamweaver » 06 Apr 2019, 09:21

I didn't realise just how many Australianisms could be incomprehensible to other English speakers!

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Re: Australian expressions

Post by Perrorist » 06 Apr 2019, 09:54

A fair few of those are British. Surprised that neither "derro" for derelict (person) nor "reffo" for refugee were mentioned.

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Re: Australian expressions

Post by Betty » 06 Apr 2019, 17:28

Several of those expressions are still used in the U.K. :icon_biggrin:
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Re: Australian expressions

Post by Perrorist » 06 Apr 2019, 18:36

No mention either of "Blind Freddy" or "as happy as Larry". Or "shoot through like a Bondi tram". And "Lower than a snake's duodenum (or willy)". Also "Kick the tin". And "Hit the toe" for walk or run.

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Re: Australian expressions

Post by Dreamweaver » 07 Apr 2019, 07:41

The abbreviation plus o seems to be common - abo, agro, ambo, ammo, arvo, chemo, demo, garbo, journo, kiddo, milko, muso, nympho, pervo, psycho, Salvo, smoko, troppo, typo, yobbo, for example. This seems reasonable, given that many languages use o on the end of words to designate something, but I'm not sure what. Once I was told it meant 'one' or '-man', but often 'ie' does that, like 'postie'. But 'ie' more often seems to mean 'little one', so perhaps o is more for a bigger or stronger one, and ie for a less threatening one?
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Re: Australian expressions

Post by Perrorist » 07 Apr 2019, 08:31

The "-o" ending indicates male in Italian, with "-a" for female (maestro, donna). I agree, also, that "-ie" usually indicates a diminutive, or a member of a group (groupie, pollie) perhaps. It could also be spelt "-y" (bikey).

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Re: Australian expressions

Post by Slapsy » 07 Apr 2019, 14:20

I thought the most noticeable omission was,"London to a brick on',made famous by the late,great Ken Howard.
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Re: Australian expressions

Post by mavisbramston » 08 Apr 2019, 20:52

My uncle often said when the sheep dogs were running that they were running flat as a strap.

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Re: Australian expressions

Post by Phantom » 19 Apr 2019, 10:03

Things are crook in Tallarook :icon_biggrin:
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Re: Australian expressions

Post by Dreamweaver » 19 Apr 2019, 11:16

There ain't no work in Bourke.
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Re: Australian expressions

Post by Perrorist » 19 Apr 2019, 12:30

It's even worse back o' Bourke.

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