Voices our own voices

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Dreamweaver
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by Dreamweaver » 19 Feb 2017, 10:50

I moved from Victoria to Queensland, and found Malvern Star bicycles sounded different! Victorian for Malvern is Molvern, in Qld the 'a' is as in apple. My English friend says both are wrong, the 'a' is as in all.

'Mall' is an odd one, Aussies seem to be all at sea over it. The 'a' there is often as in all, but others thinking of Pall Mall and running pell mell go for the apple variation. I haven't heard anyone opt for an e egg-like vowel, but I heard - strange to my ear and my logic - Moll.

Someone please advise me?
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mavisbramston
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by mavisbramston » 19 Feb 2017, 13:26

Oh that Yorkshire accent is absolutely beautiful. I was there last year in places like Whitby and York etc and honestly its a beautiful sccent.
Ever heard American actors trying our accent...they mostoy make us cockney lol. Dream I must was my face in the hison lol. Good one

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lynny
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by lynny » 19 Feb 2017, 16:06

Mavis, I have never heard anyone called 'duck' in Tas. We shoot 'em but dont use 'em as a term of endearment......I'll gladly be proven wrong.....Used a lot in Birmingham though back when I was young.

I always hear Mall with an all DW. M-all-vern is how the place in the UK is pronounced and how its said in Tas too. Its an Aussie made bike so your guess is as good as mine.

I refuse to stop saying bloke though. Its a great word.
I live next to a school and often hear a teacher calling the children 'guys' and that gets right up my nose but then I'm just a cranky old chook. :icon-mrgreen:

Talking of actors and accents......Meryl Streep....dingoes and babies? :lol:
I love Meryl but she shouldnt have done that movie. IMO

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Perrorist
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by Perrorist » 19 Feb 2017, 18:03

'duck' was used in Nottingham when I was young.

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Dreamweaver
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by Dreamweaver » 19 Feb 2017, 20:30

I've only heard elderly women referred to as old ducks, and duckie was a term of endearment mainly from women to women. My sister and I used to address each other as an insult, as 'Lovie duckie darling dirty dishcloth.' One day a visitor was impressed with us, after our conversation went something like this -
"Would you mind fetching that for me, Lovie?"
"Not at all, Duckie. My pleasure."
""Thank you so much, Darling."
Dirty dishcloth wasn't verbalised, but our eyes said it!

Visitor commented to Mum that she'd never heard two sisters be so nice to each other.
:heeheehee
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mavisbramston
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by mavisbramston » 20 Feb 2017, 11:00

I used to visit Launceston in my youth and I certainly heard duck used often. Come to think of it you might be right as I have not heard it in later years. I do remember laughing as a kid and saying I was not a duck.
There was actually a joke.
Why do Taswegians call each other duck?
Because they have webbed feet
Of course its entirely possible the word has disappeared like using you as a plural. Another one Imnever hear. I cannot recall TEA being used for DINNER. When I say whats for tea? I get blank looks. I am going off track arent I . Sorry folks.
Last edited by mavisbramston on 20 Feb 2017, 12:05, edited 1 time in total.

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Perrorist
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by Perrorist » 20 Feb 2017, 11:19

I don't know if they still do it, but I recall Queenslanders ending sentences with "eh".

Malcolm Fraser, a Victorian, pronounced "Mal" as "Mel".

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