Erfan Dana

Major issues which will affect Australia and the World

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Dreamweaver
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Erfan Dana

Post by Dreamweaver » 04 Jul 2018, 23:45

Erfan Dana@Adil73443370
I'm a refugee who fled war and violence, human right activist, studying international human rights law, concerned with fairness and freedom of equality.

West Borneo, Indonesia
Joined April 2017
38 Photos and videos
Erfan Dana has been tweeting since 2017, quoting Sarah Hanson Young from 2016, until May this year, about 12 months. It is interesting to follow the story he tells. Start at the bottom of the page and work up.
https://twitter.com/Adil73443370

He is now free, in Batam, Indonesia. He now writes, in perfect English,
4 July 2018. My sixth day of freedom. It’s still hard to believe that I am here, living in an open and clean environment, breathing the sweet fresh air of freedom.

I no longer wake to the predictable, dreary misery of the detention centre where I spent years of my life. There are no intimidating high fences around me, no more massive locked doors to confine me to my room. No Immigration security guards chase me when I walk in the street, freely, like an ordinary person. It feels wonderful to be able to step outside and go for a morning beach walk. I relish my freedom to walk uninterrupted down a broad street bordered on both sides by tall, beautiful green trees.

From the first day I arrived here, I’ve been overwhelmed by an unfamiliar feeling of happiness. The accommodation – an apartment on the top floor of a four-storey building – is very good. I have a comfortable bed and a quiet room. I'm sure I will live here happily for the time being.

However, I’ve decided it’s important to build up excellent, positive relationships with the Indonesian people living in the area. Although I can’t work, I intend to participate in community volunteering services, like environmental clean-up. I’m looking forward to learning more about Indonesian culture. I will respect the local people and treat them with friendliness, and I am 100% sure that my brothers in this community will do the same.

We are all determined to do everything possible to show the people here what refugees are really like, to counteract the distorted stories the guards and prison camp officers told the locals about us, stories designed to present us as a threat. By our words and actions, those of us who are free now will work to establish good relationships with people here so that they will see who we really are. Then they will understand our situation, and our need to live here in safety, with dignity and value.

To my brothers in prison camps, know that I can't be spiritually happy and free until you are all free and safe.
I dream, therefore I am.

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Warrigal
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Re: Erfan Dana

Post by Warrigal » 05 Jul 2018, 19:02

Why can't we find it in our hearts to welcome such people?
Why do we so easily accept that asylum seekers will destroy our country?
They are much more likely to enhance it.
If you don't have an ASIO file by now then you should be ashamed of yourself.

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kfchugo
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Re: Erfan Dana

Post by kfchugo » 05 Jul 2018, 20:53

Actually, we DO welcome such people......unfortunately, among refugees, such people are a small minority. Many (not ALL) refugees come here and go straight into the welfare system. A high number stay there, happy to live on an income that most Australians could not. Those that come here, learn the language, get a job and work at assimilating are always MORE than welcome.

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Dreamweaver
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Re: Erfan Dana

Post by Dreamweaver » 16 Oct 2018, 08:22

https://vimeo.com/218155495
Short video, narrated by sociologist Zygmunt Bauman, via Talk to Al Jazeera
"Why the world fears refugees"
I dream, therefore I am.

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Perrorist
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Re: Erfan Dana

Post by Perrorist » 16 Oct 2018, 08:35

kfchugo wrote:
05 Jul 2018, 20:53
Actually, we DO welcome such people......unfortunately, among refugees, such people are a small minority. Many (not ALL) refugees come here and go straight into the welfare system. A high number stay there, happy to live on an income that most Australians could not.
What evidence do you have for that claim?

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kfchugo
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Re: Erfan Dana

Post by kfchugo » 16 Oct 2018, 15:23

Just expressing an opinion, Perry..... do your own research! :character-oldtimer:

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Re: Erfan Dana

Post by Perrorist » 16 Oct 2018, 16:40

I don't need to do the research - it wasn't me making the statement.

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Dreamweaver
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Re: Erfan Dana

Post by Dreamweaver » 16 Oct 2018, 18:07

I am sure Hugo that you would welcome such people, but our government doesn't. I believe most are anxious to learn the language, get a job and work at assimilating, but I am thinking of a friend from Iran. The family, Bahais, had to flee, went to Saudi Arabia where the husband got a high level job. The daughter got involved with a boy related to the royal family, which wasn't on for Bahais, so daughter had to leave. Mother and children came to Australia as other relatives had migrated here, all with good incomes. She and the children were fully supported financially by husband's Saudi money, house and car bought, uni fees payed, etc. They were deported, went to Dubai, and I've lost touch with them. They were fortunate in being able to go there, although separated from family.

As for those others who were high income earners and had to flee, expecting to pay their way in Australia by resuming work, they can find themselves caught in the unemployment trap. Many Aussies as well are liable to suffer, and it's easy to blame refugees, but that's putting our heads in the sand. There have to be other solutions, more cheaply produced nutritious food, less global population through education and birth control. Not "I'm alright, Jack, and you can go xxxx yourself." That is not the attitude of the land of the Fair Go.
I dream, therefore I am.

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kfchugo
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Re: Erfan Dana

Post by kfchugo » 17 Oct 2018, 16:54

DW, there is a different story for every refugee (for every person on the planet, actually) and I dont doubt your facts. I know of many refugees who have settled here successfully and made good lives for themselves. Some, albeit on lesser salaries than they may heave enjoyed in their home country. My doctor is Muslim and one of his Muslim co-workers was a surgeon in his home country but can only practice here as a GP. I have no issue with these people, it is the others who enter this country with no language or employment skills and virtually spend their lives suckling from the public teat. Likewise, I have great concerns about the many Australians in similar circumstances who are happy to live off welfare virtually from the cradle to the grave. I have always paid my taxes and take pride in Australias welfare safety-net system - those who need help should get it in a prosperous society.
However, speaking ill of the bludgers and layabouts who sponge off this same system seems to be politically incorrect these days. "Work" really has become a four letter word.
Our immigration policy of non-discrimination is a politically correct joke and while we do take in a great many decent and deserving people, we also open our doors to accept some of the world's problems. :character-oldtimer:

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Warrigal
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Re: Erfan Dana

Post by Warrigal » 17 Oct 2018, 18:32

Hugo, the Australian social welfare system is probably the best targeted on this planet.
In fact it is rather harsh. A man who has started coming to our church has been homeless and lived, if you could call it living, on Central railway station until he was provided with accommodation by Sydney City Mission. He now has a small unit at reduced rent and is on NewStart.

He has had his benefit cancelled for not turning up for an appointment. He had a medical appointment that clashed with the time he was told to see his case worker so he rang the day before but his case worker was not available. He spoke to another worker, explained why he could not make the appointment and said he would come the next day at the same time. This worker said he would pass on the message. When he did go to the office his case worker kept him waiting for hours and eventually his back was giving him so much pain that he walked out. For that his benefits were automatically cancelled. Now he is unable to pay his rent or buy food.

Don't get me started on the ridiculous number of job applications he has to make every week, all unassisted.
If you don't have an ASIO file by now then you should be ashamed of yourself.

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Re: Erfan Dana

Post by Perrorist » 17 Oct 2018, 21:31

The system is designed to discourage people from using it. The government deliberately reduced support staff numbers, so that applicants have to spend hours waiting on the phone to speak to someone.

Recipients of NewStart have to apply for 40 jobs per month, even when there are few opportunities to do so, leading to sham interviews to reach the required number or failure to meet mutual obligation requirements and thus loss of allowance. Despite rising job numbers, the level of unemployment remains at around 5.6%. You're not unemployed if you're paid to work at least one hour per week. There are a lot of people struggling on part-time work.

Regarding social services, you need to be an Australian citizen or holding a permanent visa to receive allowances. Most visas granted to undocumented migrants prevent them from receiving benefits for two years (predicted to increase to four years).

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