Global pension poverty

How can we improve the prognosis for our maturing Australians? Suggestions, ideas, proposals for better social and health issues, including retirement accommodation, etc.

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Dreamweaver
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Global pension poverty

Post by Dreamweaver » 19 Dec 2015, 20:47

A recent report showed that 12.6 percent of people aged 65 and over in OECD countries are living in relative income poverty. That is defined as an income below half the national median equivalised household income. Older women are at greater risk of poverty than men with “the older old” (75 and older) falling on hard times more frequently than “the younger old” (aged 66-75).

Where is global retiree poverty least prevalent? The Netherlands and France.
Where most prevalent? South Korea, Australia and the United States.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/niallmccart ... fographic/
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grandduke
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Re: Global pension poverty

Post by grandduke » 19 Dec 2015, 23:56

Means testing and Australia from memory is the only country
that does it correct me if i’m wrong, so how is it we have pension
poverty in this nation of riches.

Snippet from wikipedia. The economy of Australia is one of the largest mixed market economies in the world, with a GDP of US$1.525 trillion as of 2014.[21] Australia's total wealth is 6.4 trillion dollars.[22] In 2012, it was the 12th largest national economy by nominal GDP[23] and the 17th-largest measured by PPP-adjusted GDP, about 1.7% of the world economy. Australia is the 19th-largest importer and 19th-largest exporter. The Reserve Bank of Australia publishes forecasts of the economy quarterly. :thinking:
“You see things; and you say, ‘Why?’ But I dream things that never were; and I say, ‘Why not?’”
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Buck_naked
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Re: Global pension poverty

Post by Buck_naked » 20 Dec 2015, 05:40

why are so many people in need of a pension if we are indeed the 12 richest.
people have had 65 years to prepare for retirement.
Look at the future with people living to 150.
do you really think the tax payer is going to fund your lifestyle and pay all your medical expenses for 85 years?

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grandduke
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Re: Global pension poverty

Post by grandduke » 20 Dec 2015, 08:43

So you are entirely independent of the government
for either pension, or medical, i have always had
private health cover yet still require some assistance
from medicare, the greater part of my pension is from
a super fund and from overseas with a top up from Centrelink
so i can only assume the way you speak you are a fully self
funded retiree, so would i have been had it not been for circumstances
in life.
Which brings me to my point, there are thousands of people out there
where circumstance did not favour them, there is nothing equal in life.
“You see things; and you say, ‘Why?’ But I dream things that never were; and I say, ‘Why not?’”
George Bernard Shaw

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Dreamweaver
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Re: Global pension poverty

Post by Dreamweaver » 20 Dec 2015, 09:01

I didn't question the Forbes report, but perhaps I should have. Was it estimating how much per capita is spent on pensions, or how much per low income earner is spent on pensions? 8-[

Someone with a better head for figures than I have, please!
:thinking:
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Warrigal
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Re: Global pension poverty

Post by Warrigal » 24 Dec 2015, 00:31

Pensioners receive lots of benefits that don't come in the form of money.

Today was a good example for us.
Hubby rolled over in bed last night and something shifted in his left knee and he was in considerable pain. This morning he could barely walk and a phone call to his knee surgeon revealed that his office was now closed until the new year.

I didn't think that I could get him into the car by myself so rang his GP for advice. He said X rays and suggested the hospital.
Then I rang for an ambulance and two young female paramedics came and got him into the ambulance and delivered him to the emergency dept.
This transportation was free because we are pensioners.

He was X rayed and had blood taken in case of an infection. Then because we are both over 70 we saw a social worker who recommended we be assessed by the ACAT for home assistance, the physio who organised the hire of a frame and an occupational therapist who asked questions about our home situation and talked about getting some minor modifications. All of this could have been free under medicare but we elected to use our private cover because the hospital gets a bit more that way.

We haven't paid for any subscriptions since about July under the PBS because we hit the safety net early this year.

We are able to travel all day on public transport for just $2.50. Even our green grocer and the hairdresser give discounts for seniors.
Our pensions are indexed and adjusted twice a year.

All in all I reckon that seniors and pensioners in this country have it pretty good.
If you don't have an ASIO file by now then you should be ashamed of yourself.

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grandduke
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Re: Global pension poverty

Post by grandduke » 24 Dec 2015, 08:52

Yes i agree with you Warrigal i’m a mypost concessional account holder
and on the 4th January Australia post are introducing a two speed system
for letters priority that will be delivered to the current time table and
regular which will take an extra two business day to deliver.
Also from the 4th January there will be an increase in letter prices but
no increase for concessional stamps and you can still get your 50 stamps
at the price of 60 cents but get this, from 4 January 2016 the 60 cent
concessional stamps will be tied to the regular service thus taking two extra days
to deliver to get the delivery at the faster priority speed you will have to fix a
priority label next to your concessional stamp priority labels cost 50 cents
gotcha, you may squirm and you may run but we will get the blood out of you
whatever it takes. :thinking: :character-oldtimer:
“You see things; and you say, ‘Why?’ But I dream things that never were; and I say, ‘Why not?’”
George Bernard Shaw

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Dreamweaver
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Re: Global pension poverty

Post by Dreamweaver » 24 Dec 2015, 17:18

I too agree. Having faced financial difficulties most of my life, I find the benefits now have placed me in a no worries situation. I don't care if they even cut the pension payments, as long as other benefits continue to be sufficient. :happy-sunshine:
I dream, therefore I am.

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terra
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Re: Global pension poverty

Post by terra » 27 Dec 2015, 11:53

I don't feel the least bit guilty for accepting the aged pension, even though Centrelink have just reduced mine by $33 per fortnight because I dare to "earn too much" by working a regular part-time job two days per week.... which is just 5 hours work per day.

Yep !... I don't feel guilty at all !
I worked continuously since I left school at 15 until my retirement at 60.
During the latter part of my working life, I worked overtime when ever I could to better my standard of living.
The government rewarded me by taxing me 49 cents in the dollar.
Yeah..... I've paid my dues.
"Life's too short to drink cheap wine".

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grandduke
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Re: Global pension poverty

Post by grandduke » 27 Dec 2015, 12:49

To right Terra i to was subject to those rates now from
the first July 2015 it is 45c in each dollar over $180,000
plus 2% medicare levy over 180,000. :thinking:

We were raped and pillaged mate now its our turn. :wqoohoo
“You see things; and you say, ‘Why?’ But I dream things that never were; and I say, ‘Why not?’”
George Bernard Shaw

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terra
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Re: Global pension poverty

Post by terra » 27 Dec 2015, 14:20

Good onya grandduke ! =D> =D> =D>

we've done the hard yards so we're OK
"Life's too short to drink cheap wine".

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Dreamweaver
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Re: Global pension poverty

Post by Dreamweaver » 27 Dec 2015, 18:04

I'm glad for those who were able to do the hard yards. :happy-sunshine:
I'm glad for those whose hard yards were productive. :happy-sunshine:
I'm glad for me too, who has less to worry about now than I ever had. :happy-sunshine:
I dream, therefore I am.

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terra
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Re: Global pension poverty

Post by terra » 27 Dec 2015, 18:20

=D> =D> =D> =D> =D> =D>
"Life's too short to drink cheap wine".

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godfather
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Re: Global pension poverty

Post by godfather » 28 Dec 2015, 21:48

Buck_naked wrote:why are so many people in need of a pension if we are indeed the 12 richest.
people have had 65 years to prepare for retirement.
Look at the future with people living to 150.
do you really think the tax payer is going to fund your lifestyle and pay all your medical expenses for 85 years?
Sadly I don't agree with you Buck!
Most of us older 'survivors' paid into a government pension fund until the mid 80's. These moneys were supposed to cover our old age pension once we retired. Somehow these funds got lost in the economic venturi effect and not a single dollar was paid out to a pensioner. The most warning anyone got was 30 years and the result was that compulsory saving was born!

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Maggs
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Re: Global pension poverty

Post by Maggs » 18 Feb 2016, 10:20

I don't own a car now and handed in my driving licence and bought myself a Gopher in 2014.

Sometimes motorists refuse to acknowledge me and scream that I should be travelling on the pavement. Naturally I signed the two fingers to them. I hope they have to get a gopher when they get old and have to deal with a varied set of drive ways, some steep, others cracked and uneven.

I have a free bus pass valid up until 3pm daily.


I have a Seniors card which can be useful for obtaining goods at a reasonable price
I have free medicare and thank heaven for Flinders Hospital and free consultation at my doctor's office.'

I am grateful!

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