Voices our own voices

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mavisbramston
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Voices our own voices

Post by mavisbramston » 16 Feb 2017, 09:25

I better explain that apart from other things I teach voice production. I have long wondered and the experts all have different theories.
Heres my question and I have pondered this for years.
Do we actually hear our own voices accurately. Yes we hear but how well do we hear. I heard an old collegue insist we dont. This is because of vibrations, bones that inhibit what we accurately hear. For years even using the very best recording device s the majority of students exclaim that THATS NOT ME after I play a recording of them after they read some Shakespeare or what ever. Yet I can clearly hear its them. I also believe its due to vibrations in the inner ear.
I doubt this topic will be of interest to many but just putting it out there.

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lynny
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by lynny » 16 Feb 2017, 09:43

I have always wondered why I dont sound like the me inside my head Mavis. I remember the first time I heard my recorded voice when my dad bought a dictaphone home from work. Lord knows how old I was.......it was quite a shock to hear the Birmingham accent that I didn't think I had! :lol: I think it shut me up for a while afterwards.

mavisbramston
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by mavisbramston » 16 Feb 2017, 09:52

Its funny isnt it. I find this often with British accents. Accents fascinate me. In England the diversity is extraordinary even from county to county. I find the Birmingham accent quite lovely. In london its really incredible. Within a relatively small radius such diversity. Funny New Zealanders swear they cannot hear their sccent (mostly)

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lynny
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by lynny » 16 Feb 2017, 10:13

The Brummie (Birmingham) accent is quite a joke in the UK. It is amazing how many different regional accents there are. Some very distinctive like Cockney, Liverpuddlian, Yorkshire and Geordie and some that sound very similar as do Dorset, Somerset, Devon and Cornwall.

Interesting that here I sound like a Pom and in Birmingham I sounded like 'someone off Neighbours'. :lol:

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Dreamweaver
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by Dreamweaver » 16 Feb 2017, 11:03

I can understand if that's the mechanics of it. But how do we learn to speak that way? Doesn't a child copy what it hears others voice? So you'd think by the time it copied it to the satisfaction of its inner ear, it would come out even more pronounced to others' hearing.
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Perrorist
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by Perrorist » 16 Feb 2017, 13:00

Lynny wrote:Interesting that here I sound like a Pom and in Birmingham I sounded like 'someone off Neighbours'.
Aussies can still pick up my Pommy accent, though it sometimes takes a while to detect it. It seems I say certain words in a Pommy accent. However, overseas, I'm definitely taken for an Aussie, even though my accent isn't broad.

When we learn to speak, we shape our mouths to accommodate the sounds we hear. We're unaware of this, and it is a distinguishable part of our accent, which is why it can be difficult to lose as you get older even though your pronunciation and inflection may change.

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Betty
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by Betty » 16 Feb 2017, 16:57

Whilst living in South Africa I asked a chap in a DIY store if he could help me, he said to me that's a Suffolk accent, I said no but I do come from close to the Suffolk border.

Then there was the time in Hong Kong I asked a Chinese man directions to somewhere and he said to me, you come from Essex and he proceeded to tell me he used to live in Essex and although the town he lived in was several miles from where I come from he still detected that Essex accent.
A rose by any other name...............

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godfather
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by godfather » 16 Feb 2017, 20:42

Accents!
Hmmmm, I've been living here since 1959 and without failure my strong accent of the German language still makes sure that I am not mistaken for a lazy Australian ocker!

That is a very long time and some very dedicated intent to switch to sound like a local!
It isn't always possible and I have now given up trying to sound like the 'croc-hunter', and instead being one of the normal 'boatpeople' who arrived here in 1959!

:heeheehee :heeheehee :heeheehee
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mavisbramston
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by mavisbramston » 17 Feb 2017, 19:46

Thank you everyone..very interesting input.

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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by mavisbramston » 18 Feb 2017, 18:55

Seeing you folk are as interested in accents as I am do we have an Australian accent? Does it differ from state to state etc? I am not really sure. I do notice colloquial expressions such as BUT in NSW . Eg I know what you mean BUT. in Tasmainia words like DUCK. Eg hello duck or thats ok duck.
I like the word bloke sad to see it being replaced by the American guy. I used to love the clever way Aussie kids used the word you as a plural eg Are yous coming?
This lovely expression has gone due to pedantic grammar Nazis.

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Dreamweaver
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by Dreamweaver » 18 Feb 2017, 22:53

Do you know what a bison is?
A thing that an Austrile-ian washes his fice in.
:lol:

A lady from Yorkshire told me that 'ay' was the most noticeable difference for her, years ago.

Also at first she couldn't understand when people asked "How are you?" That might be less to do with accent than intonation. Much more recently a young English lass fresh off the plane was horrified to hear at the airport abuse flowing between Aussie arrivals and those meeting them. When asked what the abusive tones indicated, she was told it was just a standard Aussie greeting - "Ow yer goin' mate!"
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godfather
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by godfather » 18 Feb 2017, 23:02

I agree Mavis, the Political Correctness fad has changed so may things in Australia almost making the unique language sterile.
When I arrived some 58 years ago I could hardly understand the lingo despite having learned "proper" English for seven years in school.

The broad ocker accent was the same in all States (I will stand corrected on that one) and very difficult to understand by us 'Wogs' from Europe.

I thought this was God's country and made up my mind to stay here 5 minutes after setting my first foot ashore.

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Betty
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by Betty » 19 Feb 2017, 03:35

Mavis......................you would still be a bloke in my home town particularly when you are speaking face to face with the locals. :icon_biggrin:
A rose by any other name...............

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Betty
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by Betty » 19 Feb 2017, 03:43

My ex husband is a Yorkshire man and I always reckoned I said 'yes' when I should have said 'no'....................damn those accents. :heeheehee
A rose by any other name...............

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Perrorist
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Re: Voices our own voices

Post by Perrorist » 19 Feb 2017, 06:44

I use "bloke" quite a bit. I remember it being used in England, too. It's supposedly of Irish, Gypsy, or Hindu origin -- take your pick.

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